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Old 03-01-2011, 10:31 AM   #1
Coringa Joker
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Higher x lower frequency training at the same volume

This is a a study conducted in Norway. Seems that it is not published yet.



Results from the frequency levels

nsf_logo_liten.jpgResultatene by frequency project starts to become clear - and so far shows they not only clear trends, the results are statistically significant. Bjørnar Brende Smestad participated in the project and has here written a preliminary report.

The study was conducted in autumn, where a large group of power lifters (27 athletes competed at the pre-testing) was collected on Sports College in Oslo for different pretester before they were divided into two training groups: A group that was training three sessions a week and a that would train six sessions a week - both groups completed identical weekly training volume. After a training period of three months, volunteers gathered again for re-testing - and it is therefore the data from re-tests are now starting to become clear.

Testing athletes went through was twofold:

Strength Tester, where force was tested equipment freely in the squat, bench press and deadlift. In addition, it was carried isometric (static strength) tests, by allowing the athletes to run in maximum kneekstensjon against a force cell at different knevinkler. Jumping was also tested using a force platform.

Objective anthropometric tests:

* MRI of the thigh (change of cross section of the quadriceps muscle)
* Inbody 720 - Analysis of body composition
* Ultrasound of the m. vastus lateralis - there were changes in the thickness of the muscle and fiber angle (which may indicate the change in muscle length) tested. Some participants tested in a so-called DEXA machine, which is the most reliable analysis of body composition.

Besides these tests have the athletes also gone through a diet record of 4 days which will be analyzed by nutrition researchers at the Olympic summit.

It was Alexander Church Strip and the NSF that was the initiator of the study, and were joined by Truls Raastad at the Norwegian School of Sport, as project manager. Moreover, Ina Garth from the NIH and the Olympic top with to implement a cost-registration of participants.

Of the results made public at this stage there is little doubt which of the two groups showed the highest growth. Based on all the parameters had six days the group better progress in all tests except the jumping test. At most of the tests were also this difference statistically significant.

As an example from the tests, one can look at the overall strength of the athletes in the squat: On startup the 3-day group, 1 kg higher in squat than the 6-day group. After the training intervention, was this relationship reversed, and 6-day group were on average was 10 kg higher in squat than the 3-day group. This despite the fact that 3-day group had an average growth of over 5% during the training period.

Together, both groups increased 275 kg in squat, 217.5 kg in bench press and 235 kg in the deadlift - so strength wise, this is like getting a peak power lift on the team.

With these results as a basis, there is little doubt that this group was most effective to train with high frequency. This can be said with the basis that both groups trained exactly the same amount within a week, but 6-day group had by far the greatest progress.

In practice, this indicates that if you reduce the amount of each exercise in relation to what is common (for Norwegian power lifters), it appears that muscles recover faster, and you again can stimulate muscle (with training) after a short rest period . It may appear that the main effect is to increase the number of sequences of stimuli (training / degradation) and adaptation (recovery) within a given period of time, so greater progress. 6-day group had twice as many training sessions, and have had approximately twice the progress in the squat. The groups, in other words, had about equal success rates. workout, but the 6-day group had twice as many practices and hence twice as much progress in the same period of time.

Moreover, a research on how long this effect lasts beyond the three moons that were used in this study, and perhaps the most interesting - how will different exercise frequency affect athletes who are closer to their genetic potential than what these athletes was? Another approach that should be researched, is how much stimulation is actually needed to initiate adaptation (growth) per workout and how often this can be done. If you want to be able to benefit from distributing the training of even more weekly workouts?

It should be noted that all practitioners sent in weekly reports of completed training. These reports were carefully monitored to keep track of, for example, of training. The athlete had follow-up both by mail and telephone during the entire training period. Such training should take place in consultation with experienced and competent trainers.

Church Strip hoping to get published the full results of the study in an international journal in the course of this year.
All participants in the near future will receive a written summary of their results.
NSF and NIH also plans to have him one of results that will be open to participants of the project and all NSF lifts. This will in all probability be held in conjunction with the Junior Championships in Hamar in June, more information will be published on styrkeloft.no when approaching.
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Old 03-01-2011, 10:46 AM   #2
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Interesting read, thx
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Old 03-01-2011, 12:01 PM   #3
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Interesting, thanks for posting. One of the powerlifters at our gym tried out ( the 3 week routine), but couldn't finish it. I saw the routine, and the volume was truly mind boggling. Looked beyond brutal.

Most Norwegian powerlifters use relatively high frequency, high volume and relatively low intensity (70-80% of 1RM). We've got quite a few good lifters, so it works well, even though it seems to very different from what most lifters in the US are doing. I guess I'll give it a shot someday.
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Old 03-01-2011, 12:25 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorwegianGuy92 View Post
Interesting, thanks for posting. One of the powerlifters at our gym tried out ( the 3 week routine), but couldn't finish it. I saw the routine, and the volume was truly mind boggling. Looked beyond brutal.

Most Norwegian powerlifters use relatively high frequency, high volume and relatively low intensity (70-80% of 1RM). We've got quite a few good lifters, so it works well, even though it seems to very different from what most lifters in the US are doing. I guess I'll give it a shot someday.
I would like to see the full text before i draw any conclusion. If the volume was that high you cant know if the lifters benefited from higher frequency itself or if it was just too much work to be done in 3 workouts so that they could not recover from each workout. I still dont have an opinion on high frequency training i just dont do it lol

Off topic: do you have any links about how scandinavian powerlifters train? these guys do very well in the IPF competitions.
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Old 03-01-2011, 02:23 PM   #5
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This isnt incredibly surprising. If you look at all other sports the top athletes train 5-6 days a week 2-3 sessions a day, including Olympic lifting. I know that there is a difference because the same amount of volume is still done compared to the 3-day a week, but its still interesting to compare. I think this type of high frequency training is more apt for advanced lifters where that kind of stimulation is needed for further gains.

Also, one of the theories behind the Bulgarian weightlifters training 2 times a day was to spike testosterone multiple times.

Even though the idea presented in the article is interesting, it isn't practical for most guys with a 9-5 job and a family. I think that if powerlifting ever makes it to the Olympics we are going to see high frequency training, among other things, since the athletes job will be to compete in powerlifting.
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:15 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coringa Joker View Post
I would like to see the full text before i draw any conclusion. If the volume was that high you cant know if the lifters benefited from higher frequency itself or if it was just too much work to be done in 3 workouts so that they could not recover from each workout. I still dont have an opinion on high frequency training i just dont do it lol

Off topic: do you have any links about how scandinavian powerlifters train? these guys do very well in the IPF competitions.
Yeah, that is definitely a valid point.

Well, like I said, the Norwegian powerlifters do fairly low intensity, moderate/high volume and moderate/high frequency. So lighter weights, but a lot of sets, and squatting, benching and deadlifting 2x and more every week. They follow routines made by Dietmar, but they are all in Norwegian, so probably not of much interest to most people on here.

E.g, CYC, which squatted 420 not too long ago, actually never went above 270 kg ( I'm pretty it was this, his trainer showed me his routine) in training, but he trained with a high frequency, and a ton of volume.

As for Swedish and Finnish powerlifters; no idea.
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:29 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by NorwegianGuy92 View Post
Yeah, that is definitely a valid point.

Well, like I said, the Norwegian powerlifters do fairly low intensity, moderate/high volume and moderate/high frequency. So lighter weights, but a lot of sets, and squatting, benching and deadlifting 2x and more every week. They follow routines made by Dietmar, but they are all in Norwegian, so probably not of much interest to most people on here.

E.g, CYC, which squatted 420 not too long ago, actually never went above 270 kg ( I'm pretty it was this, his trainer showed me his routine) in training, but he trained with a high frequency, and a ton of volume.

As for Swedish and Finnish powerlifters; no idea.
That is interesting as it implies zero max-effort work (work over 90%). Im surprised that worked at all.
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:56 PM   #8
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How does lifting spike test? lol.
If I am not mistaken it lowers it, then you recover from the attack (work out) on your body and it returns to normal.
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Old 03-01-2011, 04:17 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Hartley View Post
How does lifting spike test? lol.
If I am not mistaken it lowers it, then you recover from the attack (work out) on your body and it returns to normal.
In Science and Practice of Sports Training, Zatsiorsky talks about it. It is still a bit controversial I believe as to what degree testosterone is raised, but he quotes research that indicates that it is.
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Old 03-01-2011, 04:40 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehopkins932 View Post
That is interesting as it implies zero max-effort work (work over 90%). Im surprised that worked at all.
Yeah, it's interesting, seems to work well for a lot. Other routines who also work well, like Sheiko are based on somewhat the same principles, as far as I know. So I guess it's really nothing new.
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