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Old 10-05-2010, 09:44 AM   #1
Joe
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Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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On the blood type diet

I have recently just finished the book which is basically 50 years of research and practice between the author and the author's father who wrote a book on it as well.. The son continued the research and practice.

You can find the meat and bones of the diet with a quick google search but the minute details, history and science are all found in "Eat Right 4 Your Type"

Briefly, blood type O was the first blood type and it was a hunter gatherer blood type that survived off of mostly meats and berries. As the population grew, wild game became scarce, blood type a emerged and it survived on a lot of grains and the digestive tract and the immune system evolved as such.

As our ancestors migrated more type B came into play and the most recent blood type (which less than 5% of the world is) AB evolved also. 80% of us will either be type O or type A.

Essentially, there are proteins in our food called lectins and each different lectin react differently in our body with different blood types. Lots of meat for type As could mean a poor digestion and an overall weaker metabolic system. According to the author fat loss can come quickly for some once the toxic foods are removed from the diet.

The book "Eat Right 4 Your Type" offers a lot of examples of how the diet has helped some mental and physical disorders with his clients.

Here is Dr Jonny Bowden's take on it who is one of the most respected nutrition gurus today. His book "150 worlds most healthiest foods" is the first book I would recommend to anyone who doesnt know a whole lot about food and nutrition.

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The Truth About Blood Type Diets Q: Is there anything to those so-called "blood type diets?"
A: The answer is absolutely... maybe.
I wish I could give you the flip answer I used to give a few years ago when asked about this: "Diets based on your blood type are nutritional astrology!" But the truth is I'm not as sure as I once was that it's all hokum, though the way many people interpret it is pretty much bullshit.
Here's the theory in a nutshell: There's a chemical reaction between your blood and the foods you eat caused by a diverse group of proteins in foods called lectins. According to Peter D'Adamo, author of Eat Right for your Type, when you eat a food containing lectins that are incompatible with your blood type, the lectins target an organ and begin to agglutinate blood cells. It's not life threatening, but it can make you feel crummy.
According to Michael Lam, MD, MPH, 95% of the lectins you absorb from your diet are sloughed off by the body, but about 5% aren't. Those that aren't sloughed off make it into your bloodstream and cause various reactions in different organs.
If you've never heard of any of this stuff, here's the Readers Digest version:
Type O is a high-protein meat-eating type like Charles Poliquin.
Type A is your typical tofu-eating vegetarian that gets sand kicked in his face by, well, guys like Charles Poliquin.
B and AB are "mixed types" that can eat most anything.
Of course it's more complicated than that, but that's the basics. There has been some research notably by Laura Power, Ph.D. on the influence of blood type on diet, and it does seem that blood type may be one contributing factor in determining which foods work best for any given person. But there are more than a few caveats.
First, there are a lot more than the four blood types you read about in the popular blood type diet books. In fact, there are about 20 different subtypes just among people with type A blood alone! These subtypes may have important differences, and may not all react to food in the same way.
The second problem is that blood type is one factor of many. For example, I've seen more than a few type A's who feel like crap on a vegetarian diet. And though your "type" may thrive on dairy, you might be lactose intolerant, making the whole point moot.
Third of all, people who really use blood type as a serious diagnostic and nutritional planning tool do a lot more than figure out your type. Naturopathic physician Dekker Weiss, NMD, a big blood type supporter, told me that he does all kinds of ancillary tests besides blood tests to determine how to personalize the diet for best results.
My personal opinion is that just using the four blood types as a basis for an entire diet is pretty flimsy, and I think that even most blood type supporters would agree with me. Even D'Adamo, who popularized the whole shebang, offers an intensive seminar for health professionals to show you how to use it properly.
And Laura Power, who did the research I mentioned, has recently built on the blood type data to create what she calls eight "Biotypes."
Meanwhile, I try my own personal "What's your sign?" party trick with blood types all the time. If someone's a big meat eater and tells you he feels great on the stuff, there's a good chance he's a type O. Works every time.



Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS, is a board-certified nutrition specialist and a nationally known expert on weight loss and nutrition. He has a master's degree in psychology and counseling and a Ph.D. in nutrition, and has earned six national certifications in personal training and exercise. His books include: The 150 Most Effective Ways to Boost Your Energy, The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth, and The Healthiest Meals on Earth. Learn more about Dr. Bowden and download one of his free audio courses at JonnyBowden.com.


Third of all, people who really use blood type as a serious diagnostic and nutritional planning tool do a lot more than figure out your type. Naturopathic physician Dekker Weiss, NMD, a big blood type supporter, told me that he does all kinds of ancillary tests besides blood tests to determine how to personalize the diet for best results.
My personal opinion is that just using the four blood types as a basis for an entire diet is pretty flimsy, and I think that even most blood type supporters would agree with me. Even D'Adamo, who popularized the whole shebang, offers an intensive seminar for health professionals to show you how to use it properly.
And Laura Power, who did the research I mentioned, has recently built on the blood type data to create what she calls eight "Biotypes."
Meanwhile, I try my own personal "What's your sign?" party trick with blood types all the time. If someone's a big meat eater and tells you he feels great on the stuff, there's a good chance he's a type O. Works every time.

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Wesley's AKA Iron Addict's take
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http://www.ironaddicts.com/forums/sh...ad.php?t=28787



My own thoughts on it so far: As a type A I tried to come to some conclusion. I never thought I had a problem digesting any type of meat or the occasional casein or whey shake which are on the "foods to avoid" list for type As.

I do handle the recommended grains quite well, and it's true that I don't handle dairy that well either which only type Bs and ABs seem to handle. I can handle raw goat milk which is also on the list of "neutral" foods to eat. Neutral foods basically mean they wont harm you, they don't have any huge benefit either aside from the fact that the food will provide you with good nutrition.

I have a huge problem with the recommendation that type As should completely avoid intense exercise and should stick with the calming low to moderate intensity exercises due to stress levels. He even mentions the type A presidents (Johnson, Nixon) and Hitler as examples of people who in the end, couldn't handle a major stress load... That's extreme, and he also went into detail how the Japanese take the blood type so seriously that they have blood types in what they want in a new employee depending on the position.

Stress can supposedly be a problem with a type A and I thought that it could possibly have some merit as getting rid of fat near my navel is super tough to do in comparison to other body parts. High fat around the navel has been linked to high(er) levels of cortisol levels -- the stress hormone but it's also a spot for stubborn fat on males anyway...so who knows for sure.


Overall, the book is intersting, and a good read. Wesley said it best that it's not a sure fire thing for everyone , no not in the least, but not a bad trick in the bag for a trainer to have.
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