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View Full Version : Another Deadlift Form Check


dbcb314
01-07-2007, 07:23 PM
455x3

http://youtube.com/watch?v=uE6W-lAwJm8




And yes Wesley... I know I am supposed to wear a belt... but that damn inzer belt is so uncomfortable.. I think it still needs broken in.

dbcb314
01-08-2007, 01:03 PM
18 views... no posts... that bad huh :(

Vivi Ornitier
01-08-2007, 01:33 PM
I'm no expert and i don't like to give advice since i'm just a training newbie but you back seems a bit arched at the beginning of the first 2 lifts, you straighten out but maybe a lower stance(butt down a bit more) would help with that.
and the last rep seems to be arched all the way to the top...

hope i saw it right and hope it helped you a bit :P

Hoops
01-08-2007, 04:49 PM
I dont' think I have any buisness commenting on deadlift form, especially with smoeone pulling a good 75+ pounds more than me (probally more but your max is listed at 500 currently in your sig)

Anyway you're pulling mostly back and just maybe using your legs to break the floor. This is why you basically lock out 100% with your back and your legs are already basically straight. You also lost balance trying to focus on pushing with your heels it seems (that's when I slip like that). I try now to focus mostly on using my quads to start the movement instead of where I feel the pressure (toes vs heels).

You've got IA now, I'd send it to him and use his advice. Sadly our elite powerlifters, short mick, byrd, and anyone else I'm forgetting aren't posting much if at all now :(

Halfway
01-08-2007, 05:28 PM
box squatting helps the push with the legs to initiate the pull, other than that looked ok to me.

actually the one thing that stood out was the hex plates which SUCK for deadlifts, if they roll they ruin the whole set. No round plates in that gym?

richardhead
01-08-2007, 05:49 PM
I thought I saw bumper plates in the background...those would help the hexagonal plate problem.

Hoops is right, your lockout seems disjointed. You can probably squeeze out a few more pounds if you work on the transition at the top.

RH

dbcb314
01-08-2007, 06:44 PM
I dont' think I have any buisness commenting on deadlift form, especially with smoeone pulling a good 75+ pounds more than me (probally more but your max is listed at 500 currently in your sig)

Anyway you're pulling mostly back and just maybe using your legs to break the floor. This is why you basically lock out 100% with your back and your legs are already basically straight. You also lost balance trying to focus on pushing with your heels it seems (that's when I slip like that). I try now to focus mostly on using my quads to start the movement instead of where I feel the pressure (toes vs heels).

You've got IA now, I'd send it to him and use his advice. Sadly our elite powerlifters, short mick, byrd, and anyone else I'm forgetting aren't posting much if at all now :(
Yep thats my max and I doubt I could do more haha. This is my first deadlifting session in months because I keep getting hurt so the max hasn't budged. And I will accept advice from anyone as long as they have deadlifted for a while.

I have ALWAYS had trouble using my legs in the beginning... but it is weird because I am VERY strong off the floor but my lockout fucking sucks. This was actually improvement leg drive wise haha.

Yeah I am going to send this to IA. I did this on his days off so I thought I might as well post it in here to get some tips and maybe he will pass by it if he is around.

dbcb314
01-08-2007, 06:46 PM
box squatting helps the push with the legs to initiate the pull, other than that looked ok to me.

actually the one thing that stood out was the hex plates which SUCK for deadlifts, if they roll they ruin the whole set. No round plates in that gym?
I have done my fair share of box squats (and doin them again) so hopefully they will help some more.


Hex plates fucking blow. But other than those thick ass bumpers, there is nothing else in that gym. it REALLY sucks for high reps sets...

dbcb314
01-08-2007, 06:50 PM
I thought I saw bumper plates in the background...those would help the hexagonal plate problem.

Hoops is right, your lockout seems disjointed. You can probably squeeze out a few more pounds if you work on the transition at the top.

RH
The bumpers are WAY too thick... the 45lbs bumpers are as thick as 3-4 regular plates so I can't fit enough on there. And they aren't big enough to stop the hex plates from taking over if I mix the two.

Actually I am not even supposed to use the hex plates for deadlifts haha. I just do it anyway. Thats why I dead ont he weekends alot because the people that work on the weekends don't come back in the back room because it is empty for the most part.

Part of my lockout problem is form, my hips rise to fast and I can't bring my hips through. Part of it is just plain old weakness. My rack dead to floor dead ratio is piss and every time I have EVER failed a deadlift it is at the top not bottom. I can get anythign off the floor but I can't lock it out.

Hoops
01-08-2007, 08:01 PM
I can comment on the bumpers we have at my school gym which aren't nearly as wide as you're saying, but they are large enough so that the hex plates can sorta roll. There is still an issue but they are big enough to give it some rolling between the angles on the hex plates (that makes sense?). So you might try one of the bumpers with the hex plates and see how that works. Again, I don't know if those plates will do this.

But yeah, try to at the bottom focus on using your quads to lift the weight. Ex said something about this once and it's helped me a bit as I like to lift with my back.

F-Mac
01-08-2007, 11:37 PM
Get your ass down further. Your lockout seemed very "jerky" and uncontrolled for lack of a better word.

You would have got 3 white lights, but you may end up hurting yourself if you don't work on your form a bit. You are locking out your knees very aggressively.......the whole motion should be smooth.

Kudos to pulling that weight though.........that is some serious poundage.

Oh yeah..........wear the damn belt, that's the only way you'll get used to it! :motz:

Hoops
01-09-2007, 12:32 AM
As a guy that pulls sort of like that I can safely say that "get your ass down" doesn't help. I can do that, but I won't start pulling till I'm where he is pulling. Focusing on using my quads helps a bit, but it still can be bad. I oddly enough really don't drag the bar up my legs much. I need a good video (I had a bad one where I was deadlifting for the first time in months with too little weight and it was histerical how bad I looked).

RobF
01-09-2007, 01:01 AM
I'm far from being an expert and only max pull currently around 400 (smaller and twice your age!) but here's my take...Bar looks too far in front (over toes almost) at start which will pull you forward at begining. As you being pulled forward then leg power lost and absorbed by back rather than transfered to the bar. No good pushing with heels in that position as just makes it worse. You need bar against shins and pull back more to get the proper transfer of power from legs. You're starting with thighs almost parallel but they are almost quater squat stage as bar breaks! From there on it's pretty much a SLDL! Check your vid out "play-pause-play-pause" style and you should see what i mean. On the possitive you've a fucking strong back lad and when you get the tech down you be moving some big arse weight!

Doc D
01-09-2007, 05:04 AM
You are slowing at lockout because of the degree of rounding when your legs have straightened (glute strength may also be an issue). Hips need to be a little lower when the bar breaks the floor; lower back should be much tighter; and upper back, even if not with scapulae fully retracted (nice idea, and necessary for WL, but not ideal for PL), should also be firmer. The belt will be uncomfortable (at the front) because of the rounding of lower back, and using it may in itself help to cue you regarding rounding (kind of the reverse of taping your erectors).

Technique adjustments aside, you already know the conditioning required: more work for core and posterior chain.

ljefe15
01-09-2007, 08:01 AM
You are slowing at lockout because of the degree of rounding when your legs have straightened (glute strength may also be an issue). Hips need to be a little lower when the bar breaks the floor; lower back should be much tighter; and upper back, even if not with scapulae fully retracted (nice idea, and necessary for WL, but not ideal for PL), should also be firmer. The belt will be uncomfortable (at the front) because of the rounding of lower back, and using it may in itself help to cue you regarding rounding (kind of the reverse of taping your erectors).

Technique adjustments aside, you already know the conditioning required: more work for core and posterior chain.

with regards to the above in BOLD, does deadlifting for bbing purposes make a difference in the need to emphasize the 'keeping shoulders back' issue?

Doc D
01-09-2007, 08:52 AM
with regards to the above in BOLD, does deadlifting for bbing purposes make a difference in the need to emphasize the 'keeping shoulders back' issue?

For a true PL max DL, some form concessions are required for biomechanical reasons - e.g. although a 'flat' lower back is needed, rounding of the upper back in convenional stance can be beneficial in terms of weight lifted. Since lifting maximal weight is not your goal per se, I'd play safe and keep shoulders back (think of the position of the scapulae in a RDL). This will make your DL resemble more the first pull of a WL clean than the competition PL deadlifts that you have seen. This technique may limit weight relative to your absolute max, but it is safer for the back and is probably more effective for hypertrophy of the upper back (due to the forced isometric contraction), and perhaps hams as well.

dbcb314
01-09-2007, 12:05 PM
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I will see what I can do next deadlift session to make it better.

ljefe15
01-09-2007, 08:20 PM
For a true PL max DL, some form concessions are required for biomechanical reasons - e.g. although a 'flat' lower back is needed, rounding of the upper back in convenional stance can be beneficial in terms of weight lifted. Since lifting maximal weight is not your goal per se, I'd play safe and keep shoulders back (think of the position of the scapulae in a RDL). This will make your DL resemble more the first pull of a WL clean than the competition PL deadlifts that you have seen. This technique may limit weight relative to your absolute max, but it is safer for the back and is probably more effective for hypertrophy of the upper back (due to the forced isometric contraction), and perhaps hams as well.

Exactly what i was thinking about too.. thanks for the info.

SchemeSC
01-10-2007, 12:12 PM
I'm a beginning deadlifter, but after I read this article my pull increased dramatically.

http://www.crossfit.com/journal/2006/11/a_new_rather_long_analysis_of.html

SoG
01-10-2007, 02:12 PM
Pick up Starting Strength and review the deadlifting section--very helpful.

Looks like to me you're doing the first two parts of the clean--there's the pull and then the scoop--if you look at a Olympic weightlifter, they rebend their knees, as opposed to a deadlift which is one constant movement.

Other than that, add more weight--you're definitely strong so keep pushing the limits.


Best,
Dave

RobF
01-11-2007, 06:01 AM
Pick up Starting Strength and review the deadlifting section--very helpful.

Looks like to me you're doing the first two parts of the clean--there's the pull and then the scoop--if you look at a Olympic weightlifter, they rebend their knees, as opposed to a deadlift which is one constant movement.

Other than that, add more weight--you're definitely strong so keep pushing the limits.


Best,
Dave Sorry Dave, I don't see your rationale there mate! I don't see how adding more weight is going to help him iron out his technical flaws...Surely he needs to back off a bit and work on technique then start to ramp the weight up again!?:scratchhe

SoG
01-13-2007, 08:52 AM
Right--there's technical work to be done, first and foremost. But it's obvious he had a lot of back strength left after the set. Like you said, once he gets a few things straight with slighly lesser weight, he'll be set to move much more weight.



-Dave

RobF
01-14-2007, 01:26 AM
Right--there's technical work to be done, first and foremost. But it's obvious he had a lot of back strength left after the set. Like you said, once he gets a few things straight with slighly lesser weight, he'll be set to move much more weight.



-Dave Gotcha! ;)